Home  |   Tool Kit  |   Library   |  Sponsor   |   Help Us   |   Contact Us

Services & Resources on this site reflect the best practices in the field of Traumatic Brain Injury

Providing wealth of information, creative solutions and leadership on issues related to brain injury since 1985
206-621-8558

Copyright © 1998 Head Injury Hotline
Mental Health Programs Introduction
From The Ashes:
A Brain Injury Survivor's Guide
Washington State

Brain Injury Resource Center
Our Services
206-621-8558

Return to
 N.W. Resources
Home

Your logo here gives potential clients instant
"point & click" access to your corporate message

Learn About Brain Injury
Brain Injury Types
Brain Injury Checklist
Brain Injury Emergency
Brain Injury Glossary
Brain Injury Treatment
Patients Perspective
Brain Injury Costs
Brain Injury FAQ
Spinal Cord Injury
Coma
Concussion FAQ
Concussion in Sports
Head Gear
Brain Map
Pain Map
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Donate your vehicle 
and get a great 
tax break 

Brain Injury Publications

Life after brain injury
 
Getting Started
Essential Skills
Personal Safety Net
Self Assessment
Denial
When I Grow up
Daily Journal
Time Management
Fatigue
Loss Self
Found Self
Pop Quiz
Anger
Memory Survey
Memory Strategies
Life Events Inventory
Wellness Inventory


Multi-Million Dollar Accident Lawyers

Doctors & Rehab Facilities
A Few Good Doctors
Doctor Checklist
Rehab Facilities
Rehab Finder
Rehab Checklist

 Advocacy Skills
Advocacy Plan
Advocacy Overview
Action Plan
Assertiveness Skills
Assertiveness Plan
Assertiveness Quiz
Decision Making
Fear of Criticism Test
Goal Analysis
Goal Setting
Problem Solving
As You See It
As Others See You
Educational Rights
System Advocacy

 

 

It bears repeating that people with TBI are not mentally ill from their injury. Most have few significant psychosocial disturbances; some had mental problems before their injury; and some have jumped into some fantasy to escape the truth of their situation. But people with TBI have had a very disturbing event happen to them: their mind has undergone changes (or at least some important parts of it, like memory and attention). 

This event strikes to the very core of the person. It forces one to face issues that people donít often have to think about: the inability to do things that were once so easy, the mood swings and frustrations that are so common, and the existence of personal mortality. So it makes sense that many of those with TBI could use some help in dealing with the issues that are raised with TBI. 

Among these issues are a lack of social awareness, impaired frustration tolerance, impulsivity, and emotional lability (mood swings); other consequences of the injury are also possible. Psychotherapists, social workers, and psychologists are trained to deal with many of the personal issues that people in stress must cope with, and itís difficult to think of anything more stressful than a serious brain injury.

One problem is that TBI is a very unique experience, and it is a formidable task to find a professional who knows about the specific issues of TBI and who is also empathic enough to feel the pain that people with TBI can face every day. 

So, as with most of the offerings in this guide, it is best to shop around and ASK what specific experiences (including educational experiences) the professional has had with TBI. Remember that TBI is not identical to stroke or mental illness and so experience in those areas will not necessarily translate well to working with someone with a Traumatic Brain Injury. 

Experience with disabilities is helpful: one learns about some difficulties that people with TBI have in common with those with other disabilities. An example of this is called spread effect, which is the perception that some temporarily able bodied people have towards persons with disabilities. 

The spread effect is the assumption that if they lack some physical ability or sense, then they have lost other abilities or senses too. (You have probably seen or heard of the couple, one of whom uses a wheelchair, in the restaurant and the server asking the non-wheel chair user what the other person wants to eat, as though one who canít walk also canít think or talk).

This section includes listings of institutions and referral agencies that provide mental health services. We can make no claims for their knowledge of TBI, their sensitivity, or their empathy. We encourage you to shop around and remember that the person with the TBI is the customer, and the professional is providing a service. As a customer, you have the right to terminate services at any point. 

But remember also that part of the therapistís job is to tell clients things that they may not want to hear and help them to face their personal challenges; this often is stressful or even painful for the client. A Ďniceí therapist is not necessarily the best and may be detrimental if the client could really benefit from facing his/her deficits and learning how to cope with them. 

Therapy can be a very exciting and awareness-expanding time; the right therapist can help guide that process to its maximal potential. Weíre sure that many of you know this, but we feel we should explain the differences between psychotherapists, social workers, BSWs, MSWs, LCSWs, case managers, family counselors, MFCCs, psychologists, pastoral counselors and psychiatrists. 

The terms social worker, BSW (Bachelor of Social Work), MSW (Master of Social Work), and LCSW (Licensed Clinical Social Worker) all refer to people doing social work, which to a large extent involves finding resources for people and hooking them up with these resources. 

Case Managers coordinate service provision and help the client to maximize the results of the services rendered. Some also deal with the emotional and psychological issues their clients have, and are trained to work with these issues, but most have an emphasis on the more concrete issues that a client has. 

A family counselor or an MFCC (Marriage, Family, and Child Counselor) most often deals with psychosocial issues that affect oneís family or that arise from family dynamics. 

Psychologists, especially counseling psychologists, deal best with intra- and interpersonal issues and the ways they affect the clientís life. They have had the most extensive training in the field. 

Pastoral counselors work with psychosocial issues, and can be quite effective when the client is religious or respects religion enough to listen to the counselor.

Psychiatrists are medical doctors who have undergone additional training in treating the mind. They can prescribe medication as well as offer the Ďtalking cureí.

In the following section you will find services that are available for people with mental health issues from the repercussions of TBI. TBI has such a devastating effect on many people who experience it that they need quick help and referral to the professionals who can help promptly and efficiently. If you feel yourself or another is in any need for help with a crisis situation, please call one of the listings in this section. 

Be prepared to give a complete description of the problem, so that the agency can help quickly and effectively. If you feel that your life or family memberís life is in danger, the fastest assistance could come from emergency services or the police, accessible by dialing 911.

In the following section you will find services that are available for people in crisis from the repercussions of TBI. TBI has such a devastating effect on many people who experience it that they need quick help and referral to the professionals who can help promptly and efficiently. If you feel yourself or another is in any need for help with a crisis situation, please call one of the listings in this section. 

Be prepared to give a complete description of the problem, so that the agency can help quickly and effectively. If you feel that your life or family memberís life is in danger, the fastest assistance could come from emergency services or the police, accessible by dialing 911.

Mental Health & Crisis Resources:

 


Brain Injury Resource Center: Providing Difficult to Find Information on Brain Injury Since 1985


Bright Ideas from headinjury.com
brain@headinjury.com



Copyright © 1998 Head Injury Hotline