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Anger Inventory
Anger , according to Webster's new Collegiate Dictionary, is a very basic human emotion. It goes on to state: Anger plays an important role in the way we communicate with others. It communicates strong 
From The Ashes:
A Brain Injury Survivor's Guide
feelings of displeasure and rage. Generally speaking, the word "anger" expresses the emotion but does not necessarily convey intensity, justification, and "form" of the anger. 



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      There are two basic types of anger: one is healthy anger, and the other is destructive anger. Healthy anger is the legitimate response to injustice, abuse, and loss. 

     Healthy anger puts emotion in perspective and leads to rational, reasoned assessments and problem solving. Answer the questions below then go to our Goals Analysis questionnaire 

     Destructive anger is driven by feelings of  inadequacy, frustration and grief. It suggest great intensity and loss of emotional control. It is often characterized by an evident display of feelings.  Destructive anger dominates the senses and leads to rash acts that usually carry disastrous results. The goal of destructive anger is to shift the balance of power, but in reality it usually only serves to further inflame a bad situation. 

     Feelings of anger and alienation are common after brain injury.  Some of that is due to the way that the injured brain functions. Another part  has to do with the injured person's reactions to the deficits caused by the brain damage.  Damage one part of the brain and the thinking process slows way down. The upshot of which can be thought of as a dulling of one's mental edge. Greater effort and increased time is required to keep pace with old standards and previous accomplishments.  The upshot of which is a substantial loss of ground and greater drain on mental resources. 

    One prominent theory say that the part of the brain that regulates emotions and intellect, the cerebral cortex -- the thinking brain, is highly susceptible to damage. The thinking brain is closest to the hard bony skull.  Under normal circumstances the delicate brain is protected from contact with the spiky interior of the skull by a cushion of fluids.

    However, during car crashes, and the like, that natural cushion does not provide adequate protection, and you end up with a lame brain.  The reason for that, as the experts put it, is the emotional brain, which is bundled deep within the brain, is somewhat insulated from such injuries.  Once the thinking brain has been damaged the emotions tend to get out of control. 

    Frequently the services of a competent neuropsychologist is needed to help address and explore issues of loss of intellectual functioning and emotional control.  The following anger inventory is a tool that can be used to give context to you anger response. 

   This intervention offers you an opportunity to make an objective self-study of how anger affects you and how you deal with anger in your daily contacts with others.  This increased awareness on your part may provide insights into yourself, and your relationships with others.

Instructions:  Answer each question as quickly as you can according to the way you feel at this moment. not the way you usually feel or felt last week.  Be as frank as possible, your best answer is essential.

          If your anger is frequently out of control you might benefit from anger management training and perhaps even psychotherapy 


Behavior
Yes
Usually
No
Seldom
Some
times
1. Do you acknowledge your anger to yourself and/or others?
3
0
2
2. Do you take out your anger on someone or something other than the person or thing that made you angry?
0
3
1
3. When you are angry with someone, do you discuss it with that person?
3
0
2
4. Do you keep things in until you finally explode in rage?
0
3
1
5. Do you disagree with others even though you know that they might get angry?
0
3
1
6. Do you plot elaborate revenge against the source of your anger?
3
0
2
7. Do you hit others when you get angry?
0
3
1
8. Does it upset you a great deal when someone disagrees with you?
0
3
1
9. Do you express your opinions when they differ from others?
3
0
2
10. Do you tend to be very critical of others?
0
3
1
11. Are you generally satisfied with the way that you settle your differences with others?
3
0
2
12. Is it  very difficult for you to say nice things to others?
0
3
1
13. Do you usually have control of your temper?
3
0
2
14. Do you become depressed very easily?
0
3
1
15. When you have a difference of opinion with another person, do you discuss it without losing control of your emotions?
3
0
2
16. Do you have a tendency to criticize and put down others?
0
3
1
17. When someone makes you angry do you discuss it with that person?
3
0
2
18. Do you have frequent arguments?
0
3
1
19. Do you often feel like hitting someone?
0
3
1
20. Do you, at times, feel anger toward someone you love?
3
0
2
21. Do you harbor strong urges to do something harmful?
0
3
1
22. Do you control your emotions when you are angry?
3
0
2
23. Do you tend to feel very bad or very guilty after getting angry?
0
3
1
24. When you become angry, do you pull away or withdraw?
0
3
1
25. When someone criticizes  you do you strike back with your own put down or criticism of them?
0
3
1
26. Do you express your angry feelings rather than exploding?
3
0
2
27. Are you aware of when you are angry?
3
0
2
28. Do you explode before you realize that you are angry?
0
3
1
29. Do you control yourself when things do not go your way?
3
0
2
30. Do you demand an explanation of other people's actions?
3
0
2
Totals each column.      
Total Score - sum of the 3 columns      

Scoring Key

Instructions:  Generally, the higher the sum of the scores, the more effectively you are at handling your angry feelings, review your answers to each item to see if a pattern of angry expressions can be discerned.  Look carefully to the items you marked "sometimes" as they might indicate areas for exploration and work.  Discuss your inventory with someone who knows you well to make a perception check.


What color is your anger?
 
31. How would you describe your anger?  --  Choose one:
a.
Deep and moldering?  
b.
Swift and fleeting?  
c.
Sudden and overwhelming?  
d.
Moderate and infrequent?  
e.
Slow and smoldering?  


32. What makes you angry? Always
Some
Never
a.
Concentration difficulties; you lose the thread of your thoughts, action.      
b.
Being surprised or startled, broadsided?      
c.
Feeling pressured, cornered, put on the spot?       
d.
Unable to think on your feet?      
e.
Delayed or unreliable recall?       
f.
Facing disappointment?      
g.
When you can't say what you mean?      
h.
When you know what you want to say but the words won't come out?      
i.
When you feel foolish?      
j.
When you are the recipient of false or misleading information?      
k.
When you feel let down by others      
l.
When you can't get anything done no matter how hard you try?      
m.
Other, specify.      


33. Why does that make you angry? Always
Some
Never
a.
Feel inadequate, shamed?      
b.
Feel stupid, exposed?      
c.
Feel overwhelmed, humiliated      
d.
Feeling that your life is out of control?      
e.
Other, specify.       


34. What do you do about it? Always
Some
Never
a.
Ask for help?      
b.
Ignore it, pretend it didn't happen?      
c.
Find someone or something to blame?      
d.
Take time out and compose your thoughts?      
e.
Other, specify.      


35. How is your anger compared to the way it was...  Much
Worse
Same
Much
Better
a.
one year ago?      
b.
five years ago?      
c.
ten years ago?      
d.
before brain injury?      
e.
after brain injury?      

Always
Some
Never
36. How does your anger make you feel?      
a.
Out of control?      
b.
A sense of power over others?      
c.
Embarrassed, humiliated?      
d.
Neutral, never thought about it?      
e.
Vindicated, justified?      
f.
Other, Specify      

Always
Some
Never
37. How often do you feel angry?      
38. How often do you loose control of your anger?      
39. Does your anger cause problems for you?      

Major
Problems
Moderate
Problems
Minor
Problems
None
40. Rate your anger in terms of the types of problems it causes?        

41. What would make it better?
Yes
No
Maybe
a.
Others to be more understanding and forgiving of you?       
b.
Sharpen problem solving skills?      
c.
Refine communication skills?      
d.
Refine listening skills?      
e.
Review and analyze goals?      
f.
Other specify.      

What changes are you willing to make?
What changes would like others to make?
What are the benefits of change for everyone?
Are you ready to make changes in your self?

Physiological Signs of Anger:
 
1.  Increased heart rate 6. Flushed face
2.  Rapid, shallow breathing 7. Trembling.
3.  Sudden feeling of  warmth 8. Other -- specify
4.  Feelings of nervous tension 9.
5.  Feeling anxious 10.

The following interventions will help you to temper your anger - add the following to your tool kit
Problem Solving Chart.
Goal Setting Chart
Assertive Action Plan
In Support of My Views

National Institutes of Health  Traumatic Brain Injury  Rehabilitation Consensus Statement, October 1998. Download from the internet, or request your free copy by toll-free telephone  888-644-2667.
 


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